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Bad Bitches and Power Pitches:
Warning! What you're about to read is a step-by-step guide to winning at the game of life. The stakes are high. So, read this only if you dare. Have you ever wondered what some women entrepreneurs and speakers do to stand out and have prospects, the media, and investors seeking them out? What's their secret sauce? How did they transcend from being average to becoming extraordinary? My dear, they are bad bitches with power pitches! A serial entrepreneur, international professional speaker, and 13-time elevator pitch champion, #KillerPitchMaster Precious Williams shows you how despite growing up in poverty & she took the business, television, and media worlds by storm through the power of being a bad bitch. In her greatness, you will see yourself and learn how to unleash your bad bitch. She also shares the seven types of specific-branding bad bitches. Through Precious's experiences, she will help you discover or resurrect the bad bitch inside of you. Bad Bitches with Power Pitches provides the tools of success that will have prospects seeking you out, event planners booking you for speaking engagements, and the media clamoring to get the inside scoop on you. Wherever you are in your entrepreneurial journey, this no-holds-barred, no-nonsense book will show you how to utilize your bad-bitch mentality to achieve your dreams. Dare greatly!
Reviews
Williams, a pitchmaker, speaker, and entrepreneur who has won more than a dozen elevator pitch competitions, draws deep on her saleswoman talents to present the “bad bitch” as an appealing and transformative model for women in business, with an acknowledgment that it’s not for the meek or those who are uncomfortable with self-promotion. It’s a multifaceted figure, too: Williams examines seven different types of “Branding Bitches” (The Unstoppable Bitch, The Creative Bitch, The Flawed Bitch) and suggests that readers should incorporate aspects of all of them when crafting a pitch for a brand, business, product, or service.

The author takes several chapters at the start of the book to explain precisely what she means when she claims for herself the term “bad bitch”—and why she’s encouraging readers to aspire to it, too. Williams is talking about a proud woman of power, a “female who knows what she wants and knows how to get it,” who “is not afraid to be her authentic self at all times” and seizes “the opportunity to shine, teach other women to bask in their femininity, promote their brilliance, and become downright ‘sheroes.’”

Williams is a compelling writer and role model. The book’s strongest chapters concern the power and promise of seizing her brand of girl power. An early chapter lays out strategies for drafting a winning pitch, with clarifying and practical tips, but overall Williams is less focused on process than on modeling her vision of a sisterhood of bold movers and shakers. Readers specifically hunting for a step-by-step guide to pitching and brand-building may want to consult more books—but those hungry for advice from a woman unapologetically seizing her place in the world will find just what they need.

Takeaway: This appealing guide to brand-building dares women to be the right kind of bad.

Great for fans of: Jen Sincero’s You Are a Badass, Elaine Meryl Brown, Marsha Haygood, and Rhonda Joy McLean’s The Little Black Book of Success: Laws of Leadership for Black Women.

Production grades
Cover: A
Design and typography: A
Illustrations: N/A
Editing: A
Marketing copy: A

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