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Ebook Details
  • 04/2019
  • 9786214340514
  • 554 pages
  • $2.99
Paperback Details
  • 11/2018
  • 9786214340491
  • 522 pages
  • $18.00
Hardcover Details
  • 11/2018
  • 9786214340507
  • 554 pages
  • $28.00
J. Arthur Moore
Author, Illustrator
Journey Into Darkness: A Story in Four Parts, 2nd edition B&W

Children/Young Adult; General Fiction (including literary and historical); (Market)

As it begins, Journey follows Duane Kinkade, his parents, his dog, and his best friend, Jamie, from his father's departure to the war in the spring of 1861, through a season of uneasy calm sharing time with his friend on the family farm, into a summer of unexpected violence with the death of his mother, toward a winter of loneliness, culminating in the spring of 1862 when Duane sets out in search of his father by running away to the war. The novel goes on through two and a half years of the war, researched so that it is also an educational experience, following the story of a young boy through a war that saw service from more than 200,000 boys age 17 and under. The reader will enter the war with Duane at the Battle of Shiloh, where he falls wounded and is treated by a Union doctor and his teenage ward. They quickly become close friends. With his identity concealed, he enters battle with the medical corps at Perryville and Stones River, after which he travels in search of the Confederate Army at Tullahoma, Tennessee. Circumstances lead the boy to Lee’s army in camp outside Fredericksburg. As courier and drummer, Duane serves with the Confederate Army at Chancellorsville and Gettysburg. Wounded and left for dead on the battlefield at Gettysburg, he is recovered by a preacher and eventually reunited with his doctor friends, with whom he travels through the events of the Wilderness, Spotsylvania Court House, and Cold Harbor. Events and a letter about his father send Duane from the war and he journeys homeward with a young friend, the son of a sutler. Duane’s journey comes full circle as he returns to his home where it had all started, a veteran of two and a half years of warfare and battlefield experience.
Reviews
BlueInk review

Originally published in four separate volumes, J. Arthur Moore’s chronicle of a young Arkansas boy’s experiences on both sides of the Civil War battle lines gains emotional power as a single long tale.

At the outset of the tale, ten-year-old Duane Kinkade’s father enlists in the Confederate army, and when raiders kill the boy’s mother, he is left on his own. His search for his father takes Duane into battle at Shiloh, where he’s wounded then rescued by a Union doctor. The fact that the boy moves from Confederate to Union forces in this section and those that follow seems improbable, but Moore’s work is otherwise so well researched
that readers will believe it was possible.

Duane’s shifting perspective underscores war’s dreadful toll on all combatants. The boy is blinded while serving with the Confederacy at Gettysburg. Back with the Union in the final section, he endures the deaths of two friends, just kids like himself.

“War does thin’s ta ya,” Duane says in a passage characteristic both of Moore’s less-than-subtle use of dialect and the novel’s fundamental power. “It makes ya kill when ya really ain’t wantin’ naturely ta do it. It’s a horror ya cain’t b’lieve really happens.” Moore’s central point, that war is hell and everyone longs for peace, is underscored in a poignant scene where a Federal band, playing within earshot of the Confederate army
encamped across the river, begins with John Brown’s Body but also plays Dixie; as it closes with Home Sweet Home, “tears ran unchecked down the cheeks of a hundred thousand [sic] men and boys.”

Heartfelt and affecting, written in plain prose that suits its young protagonist, this sad story poignantly drives home the human cost of war.

Blue Ink Heads-Up: This would be an excellent resource for middle-school American history classes, giving a boy’s-eye view of the Civil War and reminding students that kids their own age were caught up in active duty during the war. The solid research and gripping battle scenes will engage adult Civil War buffs.

Charmaine Ball, School District of Philadelphia Reading Specialist

Writing accurate as well as interesting historic fiction can, and should be, quite a challenge for an author; unless the author is J. Arthur Moore, a veteran educator and social studies teacher.

Mr. Moore, the author of Journey Into Darkness a Civil War drama, writes with so much confidence and heart that one could almost believe that he had lived through the Civil War himself.

Written especially for students, Journey Into Darkness is a novel divided into four separate volumes. As each book unfolds, you the reader travel alongside the story’s main character as he courageously searches to find his father, a soldier in the Confederate Army.

Aside from being a meticulous chronicle of the war itself. what makes this story so unforgettable is the hold that it takes on your heart the moment that you identify with the main character, ten-year-old Duane Kinkade. This happens very early on in book one as you watch Duane, or Dee as his friends call him, become literally caught up in the turbulent and horrific events of the war.

Journey Into Darkness depicts the events of the Civil War with clarity and eye-opening truth. The reader, along with Duane, become witness to events before, during, and after the bloody battles because you become a participant in those battles. You learn, as Duane did, how to care for the wounded soldiers. The crude medical practices of the 1860’s magnify the suffering of the soldiers and the horrors of war, but also serve as a learning experience.

Beautifully interwoven among all of the unimaginable hardships and injuries that Duane endures during his search to find his father is a golden thread of hope that his arduous journey will not be in vain. Throughout Duane’s quest the reader sees obstacles overcome, friendships forged, loyalties challenged, and life lessons learned, whiile at the same time a vivid history lesson is unfolding before your eyes. Not only is this story a startlingly detailed time line of major and minor events of the Civil War, but also a diary of a boy’s commitment to find his father and who, in the process finds himself.

Ultimately, Duane learns one of the most important life lessons of all: the need for people in our lives; the treasures that are family, friendship, and love.

I highly recommend J. Arthur Moore’s novel Journey Into Darkness for what it is, historical fiction at its heartwarming best.

Michelle Robertson for Readers' Favorite

Journey Into Darkness, a story in four parts By J. Arthur Moore
Reviewed By Michelle Robertson for Readers’ Favorite

Journey Into Darkness is written by J. Arthur Moore. The book is a novel divided into four books, a device insisted upon by a young friend of the author because young readers do not like thick books, this particular book being 556 pages. This novel was created as an American Civil War: historical fiction story. The layout, design, and photographs are perfectly designed and placed in appropriate places to capture the words the story tells and visions the readers might have.

A mind blowing adventurous story of war, friendship, youth, soldiers, and death in the time of the American Civil war. One boy's experiences during the time of war from age 10 through 13 are told with the turn of each page. Experiencing sadness, grief, heartbreak, friendship, loneliness, value, worth, and pride, a boy journeys through one of the toughest times America has had to endure, in search of his father who had gone to war. He finds himself on both sides at times, Confederate and Union, not taking either side, just trying not to perish with so many others.

Journey Into Darkness is an incredible story of true events written in a way to allow for further understanding of the events that happened during this time period. Adding a few fictional characters but blending them with actual names and places recognized today as

great historical people and landmarks, the book is truly worth the read. It is a long read, but worth every word. I enjoyed this story immensely. Civil war stories are not often told through the eyes of a young soldier, and there were many during that time. Having made the center focus of the book a youth during the war makes the story hit the minds and hearts of children in a more personal way, and in my opinion allows young readers to relate to the characters and understand the plot a little more easily.

Journey into Darkness by J. Arthur Moore is truly a magical, educational, and adventurous story all readers interested in the Civil war should read and enjoy.

Simon Barrett for Blog News Network

Historical Fiction is a genre of writing that is historically difficult to pull off. Weaving fiction with fact takes great precision, it is a challenge not for the feint at heart. The facts are cast in stone, they cannot be changed. As if this were not difficult enough, author J. Arthur Moore decided to make his life even harder!

Let me explain. The author is a retired educator with over four decades of experience. The focus today in education is STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics), while this is laudable it means that many other areas are languishing, certainly one of those areas is History. This saddens me, as much about the present and even the future can be gleaned from understanding the past. In a very bold step J. Arthur Moore is trying to level the playing field. Write a book about America’s most contentious period, the Civil War, and do it in such a fashion that will appeal to middle and high school readers.

The approach taken by the author is an interesting one, the story is told through the eyes of a young drummer boy. Duane (Dee) Kinkade may only be 11 years old, but he is on a mission of the utmost importance, he is in search of his father . Dee has little to go on, other than a letter that explains he is with the Confederates in Tennessee. Dee signs on in Pittsburg landing and sees his first action at the Battle of Shiloh.
Wounded, he finds himself in the care of the Union army. Not as a prisoner, but as an 11 year old victim of war.

Up From Corinth explores the events from the Battle of Shiloh through the period following the Battle of Stones River.

It would be a gross injustice to the author and potential readers to discuss the plot very much more. Instead I will make some observations. Prior to reading Up From Corinth I had the opportunity to talk at some length with J. Arthur Moore, what impressed me most was his passion. I asked him what his goal for the book was, his reply surprised me “I want to see it in schools, I want to see it used in History classes.” At the time I thought the author was maybe not firing on all eight cylinders. Who has ever heard of a fiction book being used in a History class?

However, I was wrong, and I apologize for thinking what I did. Up From Corinth has much to offer the inquiring mind. The Civil War is one of the (alas too few) periods of history taught in our schools today. Most text books are dry and boring on the subject. It is not about dates, places, and number of casualties, it is a complex story of beliefs, ambitions and direction for a country that needed unity.

J. Arthur Moore takes the reader behind the scenes, yes his main characters are fictional, but he uses them to factual ends. This book does have a place in schools, I think it would be the perfect adjunct to a Civil War class. It would also not be out of place in a Social Studies environment. It also has a place in everyone’s home library. It is so well constructed, it is a waste to limit the target to schools. Likewise the age group. Up From Corinth is not just for the YA (Young Adult) crowd, I passed that mark over 40 years ago!

I found that as I was reading my thirst for knowledge gene was activated. My wife thinks I am pretty strange at the best of times, this morning she found me tearing apart a closet “What are you doing”? “Civil War research” was my reply. She went and hid behind her computer! Actually I told the truth, I was searching for some Civil War material to check out the factual aspects mentioned in Up From Corinth. Yup, everything that J. Arthur Moore uses as fact is indeed fact!

You can order your copy of Up From Corinth from Amazon by using the link at the top of the page, or from better book stores everywhere. There is also a supporting Web Site that is worth a visit.

Stan Stubbe

Journey Into Darkness Written by J. Arthur Moore Reviewed by Stan Stubbe

Well, I've done it! I've read all 4 volumes of "Journey Into Darkness," and want to share a few thoughts with you while they are still fresh in my mind.

Foremost, I found Dee's adventures during the North/South conflict to be most engaging and must admit that although I am not one to be overly emotional about stories of young people's escapades in general and those about a bygone era in particular, more than once you managed to hook this 81-year old to the point of tears. Secondarily, I found your clever use of characterizations and vernacular of the time interwoven with your impressive knowledge of Civil

War geography and chronology to keep the story line topical and relevant.

But to get more specific, why I found this yarn to be of particular relevance to my own lineage is because of my earlier extensive research on two of my ancestors, 2 great grandfathers who fought for the North during the War. One, Karl Friedrich Keppler, was a private in the 20th. New York Volunteer Infantry Regiment and the other, Louis Richard Brown, then a recent graduate of Hahnemann Medical College, was drafted into the 175th Pennsylvania Infantry Regiment and stationed in Washington, NC, with the rank of Hospital Steward. Doubtless, both men experienced firsthand the carnage, deprivation and suffering that you so amply wove into your story line.

In pursuit of greater knowledge of my 20th. NY Regiment relative, in the early '70's I visited the site where he was wounded at Chickahominy, White Oak Swamp, VA, and taken prisoner and also visited Belle Island on the James River, where he was incarcerated and where deprivation and suffering were apparently beyond imagination. Your knowledge of the subject and vivid portrayal of Dee's experiences therefore provided me with a broader perspective that I had previously been only superficially aware.

All that aside, Joel, thank you for sharing with my grandsons the fruits of your considerable labors. I've had several meaningful sessions with Isaac and Luke so as to better appreciate their reactions and to find that although they certainly were engrossed with the story line and adventure, would not admit to Grandpa of having been quite so emotionally caught up as I. Ah, youth!

News
11/10/2011
Book Follows A Boy's Search For His Father During The Civil War

Written especially for students, Joel A. Moore’s book Up From Corinth takes the student reader into the events of the Civil War through the experiences of a peer. Duane Kinkade is eleven years old as he goes into battle as a Confederate drummer boy in search of his father, a Confederate soldier. His father’s last letter spoke of action in western Tennessee, so it is that Duane enters the war in April of 1862 at a place called Pittsburg Landing near a church called Shiloh. Up From Corinth tells the story of Duane’s experience in that battle, where he falls wounded and ends up in the care of a Union surgeon; and the year that follows through the summer, fall, and into the winter of 1862-1863, ending with the battle at Stones River, near Murfreesboro, Tennessee, on New Years Eve.

The book’s author recently retired after forty-two years as a teacher, and moved to Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, to be near three generations of family.
Moore did signings at Ephrata (Pennsylvania) Public Library and at Treasure Hill Antiques and Collectibles on Route 23 in Morgantown, Pennsylvania, following the book’s release. He will do a presentation about “Boys of the Civil War” and his book at the Aston Township Historic Society in Delaware County, on Thursday evening November 10. Then, he will return to Treasure Hill on the weekend of November 25 through 27, for another book signing and sale. The event will include displays of artifacts and documents relating to the period of the story and to the experiences of the story’s main character, 11-year-old Duane Kinkade. Also available for sale will be unpublished manuscripts of the complete set of books comprising the story, Journey Into Darkness, of which Up From Corinth is a part.

For the immediate future, Moore’s plan is to get his first book to as many students as possible, especially since this coming April begins the 150th anniversary of the battles included in Up From Corinth, and to gain publication of the entire series of Journey Into Darkness, as soon as possible. Afterwards, he hopes to publish another significant work, Summer of Two Worlds, the story of Prairie Cub, born white but raised by a Sioux warrior who had to push his son back into the white man's world when history brought an end to the Indian’s way of life. Mr. Moore’s most recent work is a short story, West to Freedom, A Story of Friendship which tells the story of Thomas Reynold’s effort to help his best friend, Daniel Russell, a slave by birth, to escape westward into Indian Territory. All of these works are illustrated using photography by the author.

Up From Corinth is available at the Chester County Book and Music Company store in West Goshen; The Chester County Historical Society Museum Store in West Chester; Aaron’s Books in Lititz; on the website upfromcorinth.com; and on the web from BarnesandNoble.com, Amazon.com, and Xlibris.com. It has been given to the libraries at Exton, Downingtown, Coatesville, Gap Family Center, Honey Brook, Morgantown, Ephrata, Lititz, and the Fox Chase Branch of the Philadelphia Public Library System. Recently it was accepted to the faculty section of the West Chester University book store. Preview materials have been given to the Chester County Intermediate Unit and Social Studies coordinators or school librarian at Coatesville Area High School, Downingtown Area Middle School, and Pequea Valley Middle School. Early in September, Up From Corinth and preview materials were sent to the managers of the stores at the battlefield parks of Shiloh, Perryville, and Stones River, all battles included in the book. The review process takes months and it is hoped the book will be accepted in time for the 150th anniversary of those battles in 2012.

At the same time, the author’s model railroad has to be rebuilt in its new home and there’s time to be spent with a granddaughter in high school with events to be shared. There will also be time for children, grandchildren, and great-grandchildren in the local area, and time to journey to North and South Carolina to visit a son and his three- generation family.

06/05/2012
Civil War studied by students through experiences of those their own age who fou

Mr. Ned Beck, an 8th grade Social Studies teacher at Pequea Valley Intermediate School, recently offered study of the Civil War with his students through the experiences of their own peers.

 

Beck enlisted the help of author and retired teacher, Mr. J. Arthur Moore, who had taught the “Boys’ War” for several years, and whose granddaughter is a student of his, he shared his thoughts. Moore, in turn, then contacted BSA Venture Crew 1861, a Civil War Fife & Drum Corps chartered in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, to help bring the project into a living history presence. Thus the collaboration began that led to a unique student experience.

 

The classes began with a slide show of 72 images of real boys who were part of the war, including their photographs, battlefield sketches, artists’ representations, and images of markers, monuments, and books in commemoration of their lives. This is only fitting for a war in which more than 250,000 boys under the age of 18 participated in the ranks of both armies, and an additional number participated in their navies. Some researchers put the number closer to a million.

 

Most of the boys survived, some did not, most were teenagers, some much younger, some became famous, most are unknown, some were recognized by their nation’s highest commendation: the Medal of Honor.

 

Prior to the class, the students had read an excerpt from the book, Boys’ War, developed from the journals and letters of the boys who were there. They had also read the stories of boys from material developed by the Pennsylvania 150th Celebration of the Civil War website. From these readings, each developed a profile in a format provided by Mr. Beck. Then each developed his/her own profile. Some of these were shared in class.

 

In the Boys’ War excerpt, a description of a battle was developed from the writings of two boys, one Union and one Confederate. A clip of that battle sequence was shown in the form of three minutes from the movie, Gods and Generals. There followed a look at the kinds of ammunition used in guns and cannon.

 

Resources and a number of individual stories were shared. Johnny Clem ran away from home when he was ten and at the Battle of Chickamauga, shot a Confederate officer off his horse when he tried to capture the boy. Thus, by age eleven he became a lance sergeant on the staff of General Thomas. Eleven-year-old David Wood sneaked into the ranks of his father’s cavalry command. Realizing the boy wouldn’t stay home, he put him on his staff, but David, on his own, created a sutler business (a sutler is a person who sells provisions to an army in their camp, quarters, or in the field) netting him $2,000 by war’s end. Thirteen-year-old Orion Howe was seriously wounded delivering a message, while under constant enemy fire, to General Sherman to get ammunition for his regiment. He was awarded the Medal of Honor. Twelve-year-old Charley King from West Chester, Pennsylvania, became Drum Major for the Pennsylvania 49th. He was mortally wounded at the Battle of Antietam. Drummer Willie Johnston received his Medal of Honor for gallantry on the battlefield at age 11. Then there was the story of 10-year-old Tom Hunley, who wasn’t a boy at all. Tom Hunley’s true name was Anna, and her father led a unit. Anna’s father, having no one with whom to leave his daughter, cut her hair and took her with him. She never shared her story until she was in her sixties.

 

The class wrapped up with the story of the youngest soldier, 8-year-old Edward Black, and the part played in later life from the horrors of the memories and the reflection on the war experience for many in the adult lives, years later. In the case of Edward, he died at age 19 from what modern medicine calls post-traumatic stress. The reflection of a boy’s experience was then seen through that of Willie, in an 11-minute piece from The Oldest Living Confederate Widow Tells All.

 

Not only were these experiences shared, but the manner in which the research was done was also shared. A number of books were on display including original resources, researched materials, and historic fiction from which much could be learned from the history embedded in the stories.

 

In a following class, students went through a scripted experience where they enlisted as a new Pennsylvania regiment, which was historically formed on May 7, 1862, in response to President Lincoln’s call for 300,000 new Union troops. The students reported to camp just outside the building on the lawn near their classroom.

 

The camp was established by Mr. Michael Nedrow, Associate Advisor for BSA Venture Crew 1861 and his sons Ryan and Austin. The day’s program saw not only three in Civil War uniform, but also teachers in Civil War period civilian clothes. Mr. Nedrow portrayed Corporal Nethrow, preparing new recruits for their captain’s arrival. The boys portrayed a company fifer and drummer from the 1st Pennsylvania Reserve Corps Volunteers assigned to help the new Company train its own fifer and drummer. Each boy told his own story about how he came to join the 1st PRVC in 1861, as well as his thoughts and experiences during the first year of the war.

 

After a period of student questions, Corporal Nethrow took the new recruits aside to drill them and prepare them for the captain’s review.

 

Enlistment ‘contracts’ were passed out to students. The ‘contracts’ were signed and returned in exchange for a replica Springfield rifle made from wood. A fifer and a drummer were taken from student volunteers, dressed in period uniform, and sent off with the musicians to be taught how to play for the Grand Review. The rifle company was drilled in basic rifle maneuvers, and non-commissioned officers promoted from within their ranks. The column was taught how to march in column formation. The class exercised with the new company, performing a Grand Review on the front lawn of the Pequea Valley Intermediate School, with Principal Taylor Croft even enlisting in one of the companies.

 

Having completed their initial training, the troops were marched to the parade area where the musicians were assembled. There was a pass in review led by the four musicians. The musicians were thanked for their service and all were mustered out to gather for some closing information shared by Mr. Nedrow.

 

So ended this unique experience and collaboration which answered the question: what if you lived 150 years ago?

 

Mr. Ned Beck, an 8th grade Social Studies teacher at Pequea Valley Intermediate School, recently offered study of the Civil War with his students through the experiences of their own peers.

 

Beck enlisted the help of author and retired teacher, Mr. J. Arthur Moore, who had taught the “Boys’ War” for several years, and whose granddaughter is a student of his, he shared his thoughts. Moore, in turn, then contacted BSA Venture Crew 1861, a Civil War Fife & Drum Corps chartered in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, to help bring the project into a living history presence. Thus the collaboration began that led to a unique student experience.

 

The classes began with a slide show of 72 images of real boys who were part of the war, including their photographs, battlefield sketches, artists’ representations, and images of markers, monuments, and books in commemoration of their lives. This is only fitting for a war in which more than 250,000 boys under the age of 18 participated in the ranks of both armies, and an additional number participated in their navies. Some researchers put the number closer to a million.

 

Most of the boys survived, some did not, most were teenagers, some much younger, some became famous, most are unknown, some were recognized by their nation’s highest commendation: the Medal of Honor.

 

Prior to the class, the students had read an excerpt from the book, Boys’ War, developed from the journals and letters of the boys who were there. They had also read the stories of boys from material developed by the Pennsylvania 150th Celebration of the Civil War website. From these readings, each developed a profile in a format provided by Mr. Beck. Then each developed his/her own profile. Some of these were shared in class.

 

In the Boys’ War excerpt, a description of a battle was developed from the writings of two boys, one Union and one Confederate. A clip of that battle sequence was shown in the form of three minutes from the movie, Gods and Generals. There followed a look at the kinds of ammunition used in guns and cannon.

 

Resources and a number of individual stories were shared. Johnny Clem ran away from home when he was ten and at the Battle of Chickamauga, shot a Confederate officer off his horse when he tried to capture the boy. Thus, by age eleven he became a lance sergeant on the staff of General Thomas. Eleven-year-old David Wood sneaked into the ranks of his father’s cavalry command. Realizing the boy wouldn’t stay home, he put him on his staff, but David, on his own, created a sutler business (a sutler is a person who sells provisions to an army in their camp, quarters, or in the field) netting him $2,000 by war’s end. Thirteen-year-old Orion Howe was seriously wounded delivering a message, while under constant enemy fire, to General Sherman to get ammunition for his regiment. He was awarded the Medal of Honor. Twelve-year-old Charley King from West Chester, Pennsylvania, became Drum Major for the Pennsylvania 49th. He was mortally wounded at the Battle of Antietam. Drummer Willie Johnston received his Medal of Honor for gallantry on the battlefield at age 11. Then there was the story of 10-year-old Tom Hunley, who wasn’t a boy at all. Tom Hunley’s true name was Anna, and her father led a unit. Anna’s father, having no one with whom to leave his daughter, cut her hair and took her with him. She never shared her story until she was in her sixties.

 

The class wrapped up with the story of the youngest soldier, 8-year-old Edward Black, and the part played in later life from the horrors of the memories and the reflection on the war experience for many in the adult lives, years later. In the case of Edward, he died at age 19 from what modern medicine calls post-traumatic stress. The reflection of a boy’s experience was then seen through that of Willie, in an 11-minute piece from The Oldest Living Confederate Widow Tells All.

 

Not only were these experiences shared, but the manner in which the research was done was also shared. A number of books were on display including original resources, researched materials, and historic fiction from which much could be learned from the history embedded in the stories.

 

In a following class, students went through a scripted experience where they enlisted as a new Pennsylvania regiment, which was historically formed on May 7, 1862, in response to President Lincoln’s call for 300,000 new Union troops. The students reported to camp just outside the building on the lawn near their classroom.

 

The camp was established by Mr. Michael Nedrow, Associate Advisor for BSA Venture Crew 1861 and his sons Ryan and Austin. The day’s program saw not only three in Civil War uniform, but also teachers in Civil War period civilian clothes. Mr. Nedrow portrayed Corporal Nethrow, preparing new recruits for their captain’s arrival. The boys portrayed a company fifer and drummer from the 1st Pennsylvania Reserve Corps Volunteers assigned to help the new Company train its own fifer and drummer. Each boy told his own story about how he came to join the 1st PRVC in 1861, as well as his thoughts and experiences during the first year of the war.

 

After a period of student questions, Corporal Nethrow took the new recruits aside to drill them and prepare them for the captain’s review.

 

Enlistment ‘contracts’ were passed out to students. The ‘contracts’ were signed and returned in exchange for a replica Springfield rifle made from wood. A fifer and a drummer were taken from student volunteers, dressed in period uniform, and sent off with the musicians to be taught how to play for the Grand Review. The rifle company was drilled in basic rifle maneuvers, and non-commissioned officers promoted from within their ranks. The column was taught how to march in column formation. The class exercised with the new company, performing a Grand Review on the front lawn of the Pequea Valley Intermediate School, with Principal Taylor Croft even enlisting in one of the companies.

 

Having completed their initial training, the troops were marched to the parade area where the musicians were assembled. There was a pass in review led by the four musicians. The musicians were thanked for their service and all were mustered out to gather for some closing information shared by Mr. Nedrow.

 

So ended this unique experience and collaboration which answered the question: what if you lived 150 years ago?

 

 

08/28/2013
Local Author to do a Book Signing at Gettysburg National Civil War Battlefield

J. Arthur Moore’s novel in 4 parts, Journey into Darkness, is making its way onto bookshelves at historic Civil War sites and museums around the country. On Saturday, April 12, 2014, he will do a book signing from 1 – 3 PM in the museum bookstore at Gettysburg National Civil War Battlefield. He will also share photographs and talk about the boys who served during the Civil War.

Moore is a retired Philadelphia teacher and a resident of Narvon. His series has been accepted by Gettysburg National Military Park, and is available in its entirety at the museum bookstore. It is also available at the bookstore of The National Civil War Museum in Harrisburg. In addition, Lisa Barnett, Eastern National bookstore manager at Stones River National Military Battlefield, and Joni House, bookstore manager at Perryville Battlefield State Historic Park, recently notified Moore that his work is also approved for their battlefield park bookstores. It is in review at Shiloh, Chancellorsville and others.

This past year has been a busy time as Moore, with the help of three grandsons, has been participating in a number of events to promote his novel and to do presentations on the real boys of the Civil War. The weekend of June 29, Moore, along with grandsons Hector Quinones and John Rivera, participated in the 150th event at Columbia, where they set up a display of materials about the boys of the Civil War and did book sales and signings. The boys also got to meet General Gordon of the Confederate Army, who commanded the army as it approached the Wrightsville bridge en route to Harrisburg, and President Abraham Lincoln, portrayed by a real living relative, Ralph C. Lincoln, an 11th generation cousin of the president.

July 3-5 were spent at Gettysburg where book sales were set up in the sutler tent of Heirloom Emporium, and the boys visited the camps of both armies and spent time as aides to General Heth of the Confederate Army. Heirloom Emporium carries Journey into Darkness and has been the only sutler to have the books since the first book was published in 2011.

The following week saw presentations about “The Boys of the Civil War” at the Honey Brook Library and the ELANCO Library in New Holland. Each presentation included a slideshow sharing images of several boys from the war and their stories.

Narvon author J. Arthur Moore poses with his grandsons, John Rivera and Hector Quinones, at a presentation at ELANCO Library in New Holland.

A display of books about dozens of these boys, as well as women who fought in the war, included some specific to individual boys, such as 12-year-old Charley King from West Chester, 11-year-old Willie Johnston from Vermont and 13-year-old Orion Howe from Kentucky. Video clips concluded the presentation with one depicting combat as seen by these boys and a second depicting flashback memories of a veteran and his wife from his war experience as a 13-year-old.

Following a two week break, John Rivera and his brother Danny returned for the final events of the summer. July 27-28, was a presentation and book signing at Landis Valley’s Civil War Living History weekend. Time was also spent visiting with those who recreated the history, including John Burns, citizen soldier from Gettysburg, and several Union generals.

Moore's grandsons, Danny and John Rivera, with (left to right) Capt. Larry Alexander, Gen. Godfrey Weitzel, Major Gens. James McPherson and John Reynolds,
and Brig. Gens. John Buford and Horace Porter at Landis Valley

Saturday, Aug. 3 was spent at Pequea Valley Public Library’s Civil War Living History event, which Moore helped to put together at the request of Librarians Margie Parella and Sharon Sudbrack. There were an infantry camp, firearms display, and Invalid Corps presentations on the grounds and in the pavilion; authors with their books outside and inside the schoolhouse community room; and several informal conversational presentations about the boys of the war.

Currently, Moore has been working on the release of a fifth book, Summer of Two Worlds. It’s now available from Xlibris and Amazon. It is set in Montana territory during the summer of 1882. A sixth book has just gone into production, Blake’s Story, Revenge and Forgiveness. It tells of a boy whose father is killed at

Shiloh, who decides to avenge his father’s death, and what happens when he enters the war to do so. It should be available by the first of May.

Born of pioneer parents, prairie orphaned at three, he was adopted by a Sioux warrior. Among the Sioux he was known as Prairie Cub. The name Michael was all he had of his ancestry. He lived the life of a Sioux warrior’s son until his twelfth summer. When the course of history doomed the Indian’s way of life, his father, Thunder Eagle, realizing his son’s white heritage gave him a chance for a future, sent his son back into the white man’s world.

Summer of Two Worlds is the story of that summer.

The book’s website, www.upfromcorinth.com, carries articles and reviews of Journey Into Darkness and a blog page that posts the stories of many of the boys who participated in the war. A new story is added

each month. The Facebook link from the home page carries photo/art albums identifying two dozen boys with more added each month. It also carries photo albums of places and events related to the war, where the author has visited, and information about the four part novel, Journey into Darkness. It will also carry information about the forthcoming book, Summer of Two Worlds.

Journey into Darkness can be found in local libraries and public middle school libraries in Adams, Lancaster, Chester, Berks, Montgomery, and Philadelphia Counties. It is also available in bookstores at Aaron’s in Lititz, Chester County Historical Society and West Chester University in West Chester, Brandywine Flag in Downingtown, Antiques at Silver Bell Farm west of Little Washington on RT 322, and Civil War Sutler Heirloom Emporium www.heirloomemporium.com. It can also be ordered online from www.upfromcorinth.com and www.amazon.com.

Following is a list of events planned so far in the year ahead:

Gettysburg Civil War Battlefield museum bookstore, book signing, 1-3 PM, Saturday, April 12, 2014 Antiques at Silver Bell Farm, RT 322 east of RT 82, book signing, 10-2, Sunday, May 25, 2014 Pequea Valley Public Library Living History event, presentation/book signing, 9-4, Saturday, August 2, 2014 Hopewell Furnace National Historic Site, conference center, presentation, Sunday, August 10, 2014 Mill at Anselma National Historic Landmark, presentation/book signing, Thursday, September 4, 2012

“I enjoyed the excitement and suspense and couldn’t put it down.” Isaac Sassa, age 14. “More than once you managed to hook this 81-year old to the point of tears.” Stan Stubbe “It’s a moving, large scale, and splendid story.” Lloyd Alexander, author

It is hoped, as one reviewer writes, that it will also find its way into schools, as it is an “...excellent resource for middle-school American history classes, giving a boy’s- eye view of the Civil War and reminding students that kids their own age were caught up in active duty during the war,” according to Blue Ink Review.

03/15/2012
Q&A: "Up From Corinth" Author J. Arthur Moore,by J.F. Pirro

The former Episcopal Academy educator commemorates the 150th anniversary of the Civil War with Up From Corinth, the second book in a four-part series that chronicles the role of boy soldiers in the four-year conflict.

A retired educator who spent 14 years of his 42-year career at Episcopal Academy, J. Arthur Moore is the author and photographic illustrator behind Up From Corinth (Xlibris), the second installment of Journey into Darkness, a four-book historical fiction series that details 11-year-old Duane Kinkade’s baptism into the Civil War. The project arrives as the nation ramps up for the 150th anniversary of the War Between the States, which engaged some 250,000 boys aged 17 and under. Up From Corinth will be featured at the Pennsylvania School Library Association Book Exhibit April 12-14 in Hershey, Book Expo America June 5-8 in New York City and the Pennsylvania Library Association Book Exhibit Sept. 30-Oct. 3 in Gettysburg.

MLT: What sparked your interest in the Civil War?
JAM: A cap box belonging to a distant relative and stories I read in high school.

MLT: What inspired the series?

JAM: I told the story to local campers

over the years. Then, on an October 1984 trip, 10-year-old Charlie French offered to represent Duane Kinkade in the

!

photography—but only if I’d finish the story. Another, Michael Flanagan, suggested it be written in several smaller books; he hated reading thick books. With the parents’ permission, Charlie, schoolmate David Rowland and I created the photography, and I started researching and writing Up From Corinth. The 150th is a happy coincidence.

MLT: Why tell the story of the war through a boy’s experience?

JAM: The earliest stories I read were about a drummer boy or other youth. I learned early on about Johnny Clem, who went to war at age 10, and that many were boy soldiers.

MLT: How likely would it have been for a boy Duane’s age to spend time with the Union and Confederate armies?
JAM: It’s not entirely impossible, since battles often found individuals in the care of the other army. But it’s highly unlikely that a boy Duane’s age would’ve spent so much time with both armies. That’s a fiction that allows Duane to realize a universal sameness in humanity. Regardless of the army, war is hell on earth. But there’s also a need for people in our lives, for friends where we least expect them, family for whom he searches, and the tie that binds—love.

MLT: Why does the Civil War continue to fascinate so many of us?

JAM: A benchmark event in the history of the United States—as much as the American Revolution—it determined whether the nation would survive as a whole or become two separate nations. It brought an end to slavery and a beginning to another 100-year battle for equal rights. We celebrate it because it’s our history, just as we celebrate those involved because they are our people, our ancestors, our veterans.

MLT: When are the other books in the series due out?

JAM: Up From Corinth is the second book written in the series Journey Into Darkness. The first book, On the Eve of Conflict, was written like a prequel. The remaining titles, Across the Valley to Darkness and Toward the End of the Search, were written in sequence afterwards. The entire series is being read by another publisher with the thought of releasing it all as a box set.

MLT: What were the challenges of blending Civil War facts with fiction?

JAM: To focus on the smaller picture in the research and to concentrate on the pieces that dealt with the storyline. Another major effort went into tracing the history of the real units and officers used in the story—to be sure they were actually at the events within the story as it unfolded. At times, these units had to be changed because of an error in continuity. Environmental issues like weather were taken, in part, from the Time Life and Battles and Leaders history series, but were also from published diaries and journals of those present. Some made-up events are based on probability as reflected in the research, or taken from similar events that actually happened.

MLT: Does the series speak to a Main Line audience in any way?

JAM: The war so encompassed and consumed the country that, wherever [an audience]

is, there are past family members who fought in the war, wherever their regiments were engaged.

MLT: What are your hopes for the series?

JAM: My end goal is that it be published in its entirety. Several have said it should be made into a movie. For the story itself, I wish it to find its way into the classroom as a way for our country’s youth to experience the war through the experience of Duane Kinkade—and to realize that history is the story of individual people, not just a list of names, events and dates.

Formats
Ebook Details
  • 04/2019
  • 9786214340514
  • 554 pages
  • $2.99
Paperback Details
  • 11/2018
  • 9786214340491
  • 522 pages
  • $18.00
Hardcover Details
  • 11/2018
  • 9786214340507
  • 554 pages
  • $28.00

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