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Formats
Ebook Details
  • 05/2016
  • 978-1517027810 B07J4YN6YZ
  • 176 pages
  • $3.99
Jill Dobbe
Author, Contributor
Kids, Camels & Cairo
Jill Dobbe, author
At sunrise each morning, I peeled my eyes open the second I heard the call to prayer resound through the air. At 7:00 A.M., I walked out to a rare quiet Cairo street and waited for the van to pick me up. Climbing onto the van, I found a seat alongside other Muslim and foreign teachers, where I was one of only a few not wearing hijab. It was Sunday morning and another Islamic week of disciplining rich, apathetic students, was about to begin. Traveling across the globe to work in an international school in Cairo, Egypt, was not exactly the glamorous lifestyle I thought it would be. I cherished my travels to the Red Sea, delighted in visiting the Pyramids, and appreciated the natural wonders of the Nile River. However, I also spent days without electricity or internet, was leered at by rude Egyptian men, breathed in Cairo's cancerous black smog, and coaxed school work from students. KIDS, CAMELS, & CAIRO is a lighthearted read about Jill Dobbe's personal experiences as an educator abroad. Whether you're an educator, a traveler, or just a curious reader, you will be astounded at this honest and riveting account of learning to live in an Islamic society, while confronting the frustrating challenges of being an educator in a Muslim school.
Reviews
Alesa Lightbourne, Author of The Kurdish Bike

Two types of people will enjoy and get value from this book.

The first is expat teachers -- or potential expat teachers -- who want to learn more about the experience first-hand. The author gives a frank description of living and teaching conditions, including some of the details a newcomer might not think about. These included difficult transportation between living accommodations and the school, difficult colleagues, bratty students, substandard housing, and issues with parents. I appreciated her honesty when talking about her daughter's problems being accepting in a local school, among other things.

The second type is people who are considering living in Egypt. Being an expat is so different than being a tourist, and the author provides useful explanations of how to get around, what to expect in housing, shopping, and vacationing.

The best parts of this book were when the author was most candid. They were far more interesting than descriptions of tourist venues. I would have liked to read more about interactions with faculty and administration, individual students, and how she dealt with some of the frustrations she described.

Cherie Kephart, Author of A Few Minor Adjustments

Kids, Camels, and Cairo is a fascinating inside look at the adventurous life of international educator, Jill Dobbe. Culture shock, environmental changes, language barriers, and significant religious differences did not deter Dobbe from immersing herself in the Egyptian way of life for two years. Her venturesome spirit shines through each page, bringing the reader on a ride through deserts, marketplaces, schools, biblical mountains, Muslim mosques, and yes, on camels. And this is not her first time teaching overseas. Teamed with her husband and her two kids in tow, the family’s courage and willingness to not only travel and explore the world, but to experience firsthand what life is like to live in different countries, is refreshing and intriguing.

Mahi Wasfy, Author of In the Heart of Cairo

Kids, Camels & Cairo is a fun lighthearted memoir that tells the story of an American family's living experience in Egypt. The book highlights the cultural differences that Jill, her husband, Dan, and daughter, Ali were confronted with in their everyday life while living in Cairo. Both Jill and Dan, educators, worked in a so-called International school that lacks diversity because most of the students and professionals are predominantly Egyptian and Mulsim. 

Formats
Ebook Details
  • 05/2016
  • 978-1517027810 B07J4YN6YZ
  • 176 pages
  • $3.99

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