Find out the latest indie author news. For FREE.

Formats
Ebook Details
  • 07/2020
  • 9781734488746 BO8D7V273R
  • 185 pages
  • $9.99
Third-Person Possessed
Are you writing fiction in an outdated style—or are you writing for the next generation? Most of today’s bestselling authors built their reputation during the final decades of the last century, and they wrote in a style that was the state of the art at that time. We should all adopt the attitude that writing as well as today’s bestsellers isn't good enough. We need to write better than they do, using a style appropriate for the next century. This book explains how to do that. I’ve identified a specific set of techniques for writing third person in a way that allows the reader to consistently experience the story as if he's inside the character’s mind and body. I mean more than having mere empathy with the point-of-view character and even more than reader identification with that character. I take intimate third-person narration deeper and more consistently into the character, using a style I call “third-person possessed.” This book is like no other. In addition to describing third-person possessed and explaining how it works, I demonstrate seven techniques for troubleshooting your own manuscript to bring it closer to its full potential. Are you settling for a twentieth century writing style, or are you writing for the next generation? Join me now in learning how to write in third-person possessed. —Mike Klaassen
Reviews
Klaassen’s manual for novice fiction writers suggests that the key to a successful novel depends on its style. Klaassen focuses on creating a sense of intimacy in writing that keeps readers engaged. He calls this style “third-person possessed,” a technique for “writing third person in a way that allows the reader to consistently experience the story as if he is inside the character’s mind and body,” and in this eminently readable work, he explains his strategy for maintaining it throughout a novel.

Klaassen argues that most current bestselling authors made their mark toward the end of the 20th century, and though their prose was cutting-edge for its time, new writers won’t be able to achieve similar heights by imitating that older style. He advocates for “third-person possessed” as the path forward in the 21st century. However, when discussing “some of the greatest stories ever told,” Klaassen lists Moby-Dick, The Great Gatsby, and Gone with the Wind. Often uncritical of earlier authors’ prose, Klaassen’s attempt to connect their style to his own technique often undercuts the book’s claim that 21st-century literature needs a new stylistic approach. Works by women and people of color receive fewer mentions. Klaassen recommends against physically describing characters, as a reader who doesn’t share their traits might be jarred out of identifying with them; authors of work that hinges on gender, race, ability, or size may prefer his advice to “give the reader credit for being intelligent.”

Over 13 short chapters, Klaassen discusses how to cultivate a compelling narrative, fleshed-out characters, consistent prose, and a fully revised book manuscript. Many tips are sourced from Wikipedia or older writing manuals. Though purportedly aimed at novelists of all levels, the book is primarily for novice authors who lack access to a professional editor. This overview of intimate prose style techniques is most useful as a crash course in grammatical and literary devices that create an intimate reading experience.

Takeaway: Klaassen’s persuasive guide to writing intimate third-person narratives provides useful tips to authors working on their first manuscripts.

Great for fans of Stephen King’s On Writing, Karen S. Weisner, John Truby.

Production grades
Cover: B
Design and typography: A-
Illustrations: -
Editing: A-
Marketing copy: B

Formats
Ebook Details
  • 07/2020
  • 9781734488746 BO8D7V273R
  • 185 pages
  • $9.99

Loading...