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Kasey Compton
Author
Fix This Next for Healthcare Providers
The biggest barrier entrepreneurs face is the insurmountable number of obstacles to overcome, coupled with the lack of time to find solutions to them all. They are trapped in the mindset that in order to be successful they must do everything, but they don't know where to start. How do you determine what needs to be fixed first? How do you accurately prioritize your To-Do list? If only you had a compass and a roadmap, you could navigate your business's problems with confidence. Fix This Next for Healthcare Providers gives healthcare entrepreneurs a diagnostic tool, the Healthcare Hierarchy of Needs (HHN), which serves as a compass. The HHN diagnoses a business based on identified core needs on three foundational levels: SALES, PROFIT, and ORDER. It is within the levels that one can prioritize the needs of a business. Once the diagnosis has been determined, a treatment plan can be designed, just like it would be for a patient. The treatment plan is your roadmap.
Reviews
Healthcare entrepreneur Compton (Million Dollar Practice: Five Steps to Make Sure Your Group is on Track) presents her tried and tested method for healthcare providers to “grow their business without worry and stress” in this well-structured debut. She begins by refashioning Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs into a “Healthcare Hierarchy of Needs”—with three foundational levels of sales, profit, and order—and goes on to offer a framework for healthcare providers to “diagnose” the fundamental issues having an impact on their practices. Drawing on her experience in the field, and frankly confronting mistakes that nearly resulted in a failed practice, Compton urges readers to zero in on their purpose, work unceasingly to “level up” their business, and stop sacrificing their own lives in the name of success.

Cleverly organized as a treatment planner, Compton’s no-nonsense, highly specific guide dispenses practical advice hand-in-hand with diagnostic tools and straight-talking questions about running a practice, like “Do you have an ongoing, working model to reduce bottlenecks, congestion points, and inefficiencies?” and “Is your practice designed to operate unabated when critical employees are unavailable?” Compton invites her audience to design a treatment plan centered on each individual practice’s strengths, goals, and interventions for success, while reminding readers that “your efforts, your interventions, and your time should all have one goal, and that is profitability.”

The key to that, Compton writes, is to “treat your business in the same way you treat your patients– with interventions.” Compton’s many real-world examples, distilled into those helpful “interventions” for readers and tailored for each of the foundational levels of hierarchy of needs, make this handbook stand out as a strong fit for her target audience. This guide lives up to its title—it offers a host of ready-made fixes tailored to the individual needs of healthcare entrepreneurs—while making Compton’s exhortation to “live life on your own terms because you have confidence in your ability to run your business” seem achievable.

Takeaway: An all-inclusive, step-by-step reference guide for healthcare professionals looking to take their business to the next level.

Great for fans of: Barbara Galutia Regis’ Surviving the “Business” of Healthcare, Laurie Morgan’s People, Technology, Profit: Practical Ideas for a Happier, Healthier Practice Business.

Production grades
Cover: A-
Design and typography: A
Illustrations: N/A
Editing: A
Marketing copy: A-

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