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Formats
Paperback Book Details
  • 02/2021
  • 9781636695761
  • 208 pages
  • $11.99
Hardcover Book Details
  • 02/2021
  • 9781637816639
  • 208 pages
  • $17.99
Ebook Details
  • 02/2021
  • 9781636695778 B08VHH4NPY
  • 208 pages
  • $3.99
Lux Narayan
Author, Illustrator
Name, Place, Animal, Thing
Lux Narayan, author

Adult; Self-Help; (Market)

“So...What do you do?” It’s a question we’ve all answered, not too well. Don’t you wish you had a better answer than your job? Join Kai’s life-changing journey in this modern fable by entrepreneur, stand-up comedian, and TED Speaker Lux Narayan. Soul-searching at that all-too-familiar crossroads in life and career, Kai learns to outgrow an impending sense of personal crisis when a series of eye-opening encounters reveal the building blocks of a fuller life. Interestingly, they are all rooted in a game from Kai’s childhood: Name, Place, Animal, Thing. This practical and immediately usable wisdom for a life lived beautifully comes together into a one-page visual: a do-it-yourself blueprint for reigniting a life of curiosity, humility, and empathy. Finally, everything manifests magically in a picture that’s certainly worth more than a thousand words.
Reviews
Jaggery Lit

My favorite chapter in Name Place Animal Thing, Lux Narayan’s highly practical how-to on keeping spiritually fit and mining meaning out of the drabness and ennui of modern living, is titled ‘Animal.’ It opens with a confession from the narrator. “I knew that there was a connection with my physical self that had, so far, eluded me,” they say (the narrator is gender-neutral). This struck me for two reasons, the first being that this very personal admission provided an insight into the narrator’s state of mind, but applied broadly, it revealed a mystifying gap in our own existences that goes too easily unaddressed. Where, in our bodies, are our selves, our feeling, wanting, thinking personas? When it comes to our bodies, we dress, undress, or seek redress when we are in physical pain. But what beyond that? The book does not pretend to provide answers; instead, it offers ways of engaging within and without our distracted, hyper-put-upon lives, to help answer this question and other big picture queries.

Narayan’s insights are framed in the context of a popular alphabet-based trivia game played with pencil and paper by elementary school kids in India–in all likelihood it’s been booted out by smartphones–and this is also the title of the book. I played  ‘Name, Place, Animal, Thing,’ on bus-rides home from school with my friends, during the infinitely un-stimulating ‘80s (compared to any year after 2000) when it was not only acceptable but cool, to shout answers across the seats, while the wind tugged at our ponytails, knowing, but not admitting that ‘Djibouti’ with a ‘D’ was a more erudite choice of ‘Place’ than ‘Delhi.’

To practice and personalize NPAT–by creating one’s own ‘MyNPAT’ as the author exhorts us to do at the end of the book–one might have to channel a quieter state of mind. Name Place Animal Thing does this almost immediately, delivering bite-sized nuggets that tease the depths but do not drag you down, in a light, engaging and superbly readable voice. The innovation here, though, is that Narayan’s insights function like darts to be thrown anywhere on a broad canvas of ambition and ability; you can lowball or highball or put his suggestions into practice somewhere in the gorgeous in-between, but, if you truly engage with your choices as they are, you will likely discover the elusive contentment that dodges many of us who rush to be fulfilled. Narayan’s book emphasizes action–actions that are tiny and incremental, or singular and momentous in scope. Think of action on a spectrum of creative work, from as small as crafting a paper boat, to as ambitious as crafting a novel. Both are available to the reader to choose from as creative acts of self-determination and healing, but though we might attribute far more value to the novel over the paper boat, the satisfaction we can derive from these acts is intrinsic and independent of how we are taught to view them.

Narayan arrives at these insights through a seemingly simple but elegant process that he reveals through riddle-filled and gently humorous conversations between a group of mid-career men and women who are also close friends: the sub-text of NPAT is bonhomie, and goodwill. He identifies a problem, a big, sky-wide problem, like how to place your mind and soul (or locate your inner animal) in your skin and flesh. Next, approach the problem in a way that makes it manageable and down-to-earth. Finally, pinpoint a DIY, usable solution that can be mapped out in words, catchphrases (travel near and narrow stuck with me), and hand-drawn graphs (the book is littered with them, so much so, I wondered how much of it was written on a computer versus on paper napkins and scraps — until I read the epilogue and learned that the author wrote this book on ‘planes, trains and automobiles’ over several years and at least one rewrite). The book’s illustrations give it a rare authenticity. Tuck these into your pocket or a corner of your mind and go forth and BE! This is not to be reductive and trivialize the myriad micro-solutions that Name Place Animal Thing offers. Rather, it speaks to seekers of every stripe.

Narayan takes liberal helpings from great minds like Daniel Kahneman and Kurt Vonnegut, and the Japanese philosophy of Ikagai, crediting them throughout his book. His adaptations of their ideas are original and transparent. He does the work for you, drawing parallels between, say, finding satisfaction in ‘making’ things (think a paper boat that floats successfully) and Vonnegut’s famous shape of a successful story. Different endeavors that can be mapped to the same graph—including a final and delightful blueprint-for-growth sketch inspired by Da Vinci’s Vitruvian Man, no less. Prior to writing the book, Narayan ran a successful social media marketing start-up. He is a licensed non-commercial pilot, and a stand-up comic. You do not have to be a polymath to appreciate NPAT, but, as he himself appears to have done by completing this book during a pandemic, there are times when no one surprises us more than...

Reedsy

I have not read a self-help or self-improvement book quite like Name, Place, Animal, Thing before because throughout it feels as though you are not only reading a fictional novel, but also looking into the future through the pages. It is so interesting to see how the author so creatively visualizes a potential post-COVID modern world, where questions surrounding oneself have altered along with other aspects of living after the pandemic yet at the same time not everything has so drastically changed. Meeting up with friends for example after so long being advised not to isn't so different because friendship - a major theme throughout the book - remains a constant.

There are a plethora of themes explored within the book, including that of existentialism or more specifically mid-life crises. Yet, as the main character, Kai, explores and overcomes something as deep and complex as their own personal crisis, witty humour peppers the chapters along with beautifully motivating quotes. I feel as though a lot of people would be able to relate to the characters in this book, especially those in want of a more fulfilling life for themselves.

Readers will ponder modern life lessons, uplifting and relatable anecdotes of social life, all whilst being encouraged to start thinking about how they can achieve a greater sense of fulfilment or happiness. My takeaway from it was a greater appreciation for the support system that comes in the form of close friends. Essentially, this book is a great place to start thinking about how you can keep your life interesting as you continue to grow, or rather age.

For those perhaps entering a mid-life crisis, rejoice for this book is not here to remind you of your mortality but rather inspire you to get out there and actively make the most of your time whilst you are healthy and alive. It is a smart, easy read, yet not so simple that it becomes boring. Narayan has created quite the inspiring page-turner!

Formats
Paperback Book Details
  • 02/2021
  • 9781636695761
  • 208 pages
  • $11.99
Hardcover Book Details
  • 02/2021
  • 9781637816639
  • 208 pages
  • $17.99
Ebook Details
  • 02/2021
  • 9781636695778 B08VHH4NPY
  • 208 pages
  • $3.99

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