Find out the latest indie author news. For FREE.

Formats
Ebook Details
  • 03/2022
  • 979-8-985600-21-6
  • 214 pages
  • $0.99
Natasha Miller
Author
Relentless: Homeless Teen to Achieving the Entrepreneur Dream
From a homeless shelter for youth to the Inc. 5,000 list of fastest-growing companies in America, Relentless is a raw and powerful memoir about one woman's tenacity that helped her break free from an abusive childhood, the irreversible decisions of her parents that left her transient, and the grittiness that has followed her through growing a multi-million dollar corporation of her own. Finding herself through music, Natasha Miller took the reins of her own life and fate to create a life that is full of joy, fulfillment, success, and stability. Today, she is on a mission to help readers change the way we look at unfortunate circumstances and inspire us to rewrite our own history– no matter the origin of our story.
Reviews
In this inspiring memoir, Miller chronicles her life from experiencing homelessness as a teen with an abusive mother to becoming a successful musician, businesswoman, and loving parent. Growing up in Des Moines in a dysfunctional home with two younger brothers and a father she describes “stuck in the same storm as the rest of us,” Miller endured threats of stabbing, shooting, and psychiatric wards from her mother. For Christmas 1987, when she was 16, Miller did not receive a gift—instead she was kicked out of her house and placed in a local shelter for runaways. From there on, Miller, a talented violinist, was on her own.

Writing with clarity and insight, Miller acknowledges how circumstances like hers can foster despair and poverty, but her story becomes a showcase of resilience, courage, the drive to succeed–and ultimately, in the touching final pages, of empathy, as she strives to understand her mother. After landing musical scholarships, she married young and moved to California, where her daughter Bennett was born. It wasn’t all sunshine—Miller’s first marriage ended, followed by other heartbreaks—but she made the most of her musical gifts, performing standards and her own compositions, gaining famous fans such as Clint Eastwood and singer Frederica Von Stade.

Ultimately, Miller triumphed, founding a multi-million-dollar events firm and a record label, while befriending and recording with singer/songwriter Bobby Sharp. After winning Entrepreneur Magazine accolades, she participated in programs at MIT and Harvard. She reports these accolades with humility, and presents her journey as a coach might, reminding readers that it’s not victories that matter most–it’s “struggle and fight, the lessons we take from our scars.” Eventually, as she works “to break the chain of torment and abuse,” Miller even reestablishes a relationship with her mother. Readers eager for inspiration will be moved by Miller’s rise over adversity, a true testament to the resilience of the human spirit.

Takeaway: Miller’s inner strength and grit will stir hope in readers of inspirational memoirs.

Great for fans of: Dave Pelzer’s A Child Called It, Lu Li’s Dear Female Founder.

Production grades
Cover: A
Design and typography: A
Illustrations: N/A
Editing: B+
Marketing copy: B+

KIRKUS REVIEWS

A girl leaves home at 16 and eventually becomes an acclaimed singer and owner of a thriving business in this memoir.    

Miller opens her debut book with a terrifying sequence in 1987, when she was a teenager: On Christmas Day, she writes, her mother brandished a 12-inch knife and threatened to kill her. Miller’s vivid writing makes the scene feel real and engaging: “She chases me from the kitchen to the living room, waving the blade and cursing as a hundred tiny lights twinkle from our tree.” That mix of frightening and beautiful imagery is on display throughout this book,which follows Miller from her days of struggling in Des Moines, Iowa, to her later success in San Francisco. After the Christmas incident, Miller was briefly homeless; she got a restaurant job but continued to keep up her schoolwork and study the violin. A music scholarship led her to Iowa State University in 1989, she writes, where she met her future husband, an architect; she dropped out but later enrolled at Des Moines’ Drake University. There, Miller began to find her voice as a singer. She moved to San Francisco, had a daughter at age 23, went to work as a graphic designer at an ad agency, and developed impressive management skills along the way. She and her husband divorced, but by then, her singing—she performed at weddings and other events in the Bay Area—had caught the attention of the likes of singer Frederica von Stade and songwriter Bobby Sharp (writer of the Ray Charles hit “Unchain My Heart”). Eventually, she recorded Sharp’s songs on her own record label and received good reviews in major newspapers. Overall, this is a memoir that begins bleakly and ends triumphantly, with Miller the head of a thriving music and special events company and making beautiful music on the side. The author takes readers along with her for the entire ride, and while she’s doing it, she not only bares her soul, but also shares useful life lessons that readers may take to heart.

                    

A harrowing but ultimately inspiring remembrance with skillful prose.

Formats
Ebook Details
  • 03/2022
  • 979-8-985600-21-6
  • 214 pages
  • $0.99

Loading...