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Formats
Ebook Details
  • 02/2018
  • 9780999414026
  • 204 pages
  • $3.99
Hardcover Details
  • 02/2018
  • 9780999414002
  • 204 pages
  • $17.50
Paperback Details
  • 02/2016
  • 9780999414019
  • 206 pages
  • $9.99
The Immundus
Central California—This February, indie YA author Christina Enquist launches her debut novel, THE IMMUNDUS (Odolf Mingan Publishing; Feb. 6, 2018), a dystopian speculative fiction that shows what our world would look like if the human race began dying out and another species began to flourish. How far would we have to go to save our own humanity? It’s the year 2828, and Domus is the last remaining country. Divided into twelve walled cities known as genuses, Domus spans what’s known as the purist lands—lands unaffected by the genetic modifications that killed all other species of mammals. But outside the walls of each genus the Immundus threaten the welfare of those within. From a young age, all citizens of Domus are trained for combat against these intruders. At sixteen, Nia Luna knows little of the Immundus, except for the citywide alarms that ring any time an Immundus nears the genus walls. What she does know is that her own species is dying—their numbers dwindling as a mysterious disease called allagine kills many before their eleventh birthday. The same disease that ravaged her family when it took her sister. When Nia is recruited into Genesis, a research company pioneering the path to a cure, she knows that her dream to find a cure for allagine is finally within her grasp. But within weeks of starting at Genesis, Nia witnesses something she shouldn’t have—something that changes everything. As she sets down a dangerous path that uncovers national secrets, Nia will have to decide not only what kind of person she wants to be, but also how far she’s willing to go to save humanity.
Plot/Idea: 9 out of 10
Originality: 6 out of 10
Prose: 10 out of 10
Character/Execution: 9 out of 10
Overall: 8.50 out of 10

Assessment:

Plot: Enquist weaves a tightly wound plot that builds in all the right places and is paced properly. As this is a tale that takes place hundreds of years in the future, references to current brand names and pop culture can be distracting at times, but overall this is a wonderful story.

Prose: The Immundus is a very well-written story. The author displays expert word choice and flow management, and the writing is free of errors. 

Originality: A novel with high technology, genetic mutations, and dark secrets is not a new concept, but this novel pulls the positive elements of this crafted world together into something of its own. This novel also offers readers storytelling through a unique and memorable voice.

Character Development: All of the characters in this book are well developed. The character of Nia offers an intriguing backstory and motivational elements, and the rest of the characters are provided with enough time to develop their own purposes within the plot. A few characters feel extraneous, but they do not distract from the book's overall goal and message.

Date Submitted: August 31, 2018

Reviews
Bill Adams (Amazon)

This is a winning "hard" sci-fi tale with a female protagonist, perfect for a younger YA audience. It raises realistic issues of evolution, environmental catastrophe and the dangers of GMO food, all in the context of a young adolescent struggling with an Oedipal complex, ethnic identity, a broken family, a scientific education, and first romance, even while she saves the day. It's a lot, but the character rings true throughout. With high concept and a likable heroine, the story flows easily in a stream of everyday language, settings, characters, and feelings that won't scare off even the youngest YA readers.

Karen (Goodreads)

The Immundus, by Christina Enquist, is an intriguing new take on the post-apocalyptic teen genre.

The apocalypse here is based not just on us ignoring a changing climate, but also over producing animals for meat and unrealized problems of genetically splicing and changing our vegetation. It makes you think, what are we changing that we don’t currently understand the long term consequences of.

The story follows a young woman, Nia Luna, as she moves from school to her apprenticeship where she is working to cure a horrible disease that kills mostly those under 11, and is occurring because we changed some genes to cure other diseases in the past. Then Nia makes a discovery that will change not just her life, but her entire view of history.

While I have some issues and questions about the post-apocalyptic setting that is created, they are more of interest because I want to understand this world better and don’t hold the story back at all. 

I thoroughly enjoyed The Immundus and am looking forward to the next book.

Readers of books like Divergent, The Maze Runner and even Ender's Game should enjoy The Immundus.

Kirkus Reviews

"In her book, Enquist . . . provides some intriguing reflections on evolution and genetic science . . . a well-paced sci-fi story with excitement, emotion, and character testing."--Kirkus Reviews

Lauren Jones (Amazon)

Who draws the line on science? What would be considered moral and immoral when the fate of a species is on the line? If you had a chance to save the survival of humanity, but you didn't have access to all of the facts--how would that affect your mission? How would that affect the outcome? Enquist has an enthralling debut novel, one that readers won't want to put down until the very last page.

Nia Luna is alone in the world, with the exception of a father who works too much and her circle of friends. When the last day of school comes around, they know that they will be tasked with the job that will take them away from their circle. In the year 2828, the world has drastically changed to leave almost nothing up to chance...except for a disease outbreak that attacks children before their eleventh birthday. What is the cause? Is there a cure? Does it have anything to do with the Immundus who live outside of the twelve genuses? With numbers steadily dwindling, Nia goes into her apprenticeship with Genesis with confidence, happy to dedicate her life to finding the cure for this deadly disease and work with her father. Genesis is not what it seems though; there are too many secrets and then she sees something with another apprentice that she isn't supposed to see. What would they need to hide? After certain events lead up to the escalation of Nia's apprenticeship, she knows that something is not right and she is determined to find out why. Knowing that she has placed a target on her back, Nia starts to feel like she is in more danger inside of the genus walls than outside roaming with the Immundus.

Enquist has developed and intriguing world, one shrouded with mystery and futuristic wonders. The character development in this story is superb and the pace is steady throughout the read. For this being the author’s debut novel, she really nailed it. The words are beautifully written and the scenes are nice and vivid, allowing the reader to see and feel the characters and their passion for life. If you are a reader of science fiction, young adult, and dystopian, this may be perfect for you.

This book was provided to Turning Another Page by Loving the Book and in no way affects the honesty of this review. We provide a five-star rating for The Immundus by Christina Enquist.

Formats
Ebook Details
  • 02/2018
  • 9780999414026
  • 204 pages
  • $3.99
Hardcover Details
  • 02/2018
  • 9780999414002
  • 204 pages
  • $17.50
Paperback Details
  • 02/2016
  • 9780999414019
  • 206 pages
  • $9.99

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