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History & Military

  • The Boats of Cherbourg

    by Abraham Rabinovich
    In the 1973 Yom Kippur War, the Syrian and Egyptian fleets, deploying ships provided them by the Soviet Union, engaged Israel in the first-ever missile-to-missile battles at sea. Although the Soviet missiles had twice the range of Israel's, the Israeli boats destroyed virtually every Arab vessel engaged without suffering a loss, using electronic counter-measures to baffle the radar of incoming missiles. These battles would revolutionize naval warfare worldwide. The book also describes how the ... more
  • Desert Dust

    by Paul W. Papa
    Near the end of World War II and only weeks before the start of the Cold War, a wild palomino stallion was captured and photographed in the Red Desert of Wyoming. Almost overnight, the photograph became a sensation—an iconic American symbol of strength, independence, and freedom. After winning a national contest, the photograph landed in the Wyoming State Capital, the House of Commons in London, the Canadian Parliament in Toronto, and the Senate Chambers of the United States. Along the way, the ... more
  • Conflict to Combat in the South Pacific

    by Jackie Seemann
    This is the story of Jim McDougall's experiences serving as a combat aircrewman, ordnanceman and bombardier for the 7th Fleet's Black Cat Squadron VPB-52 in World War II - South Pacific theater from 1943-1945. Striving for accuracy, in addition to memories of his experiences and excerpts from his crewman's Flight Log, Jim obtained copies of the U.S. Navy Official War Diaries and VPB-52 Aircraft Action Reports from this time period. He wrote this memoir to help preserve the legacy of the Black Ca... more
  • Living in Heaven, Coping with Hell: Israel's Northern Borders—Where Zionism Triumphed, the Kibbutz Evolves, and the Pioneering

    by Clifford Sobin
    Written in a conversational style, Living in Heaven, Coping with Hell is a compelling narrative that answers why Israelis live along Israel’s northern borders and illuminates the challenges they face. By intimately profiling many of its current residents and explaining how selected communities in the region took root, Sobin skillfully weaves interviews with historical fact to highlight the region’s heroic past and challenging future. It is required reading for anyone visiting the region or wishi... more
  • Honors of Inequality: How Colleges Work for Some

    by Joseph H. Wycoff
    Higher education--as an organized discipline or field of study--is a relatively recent invention in the history of colleges and universities. Historians trace the origins of the modern university to the medieval era in Europe about 1,000 years ago. By comparison, the first academic studies of higher education as an institutional or cultural phenomenon are much more recent: late 1950s America. Honors of Inequality is a critical history of higher education as a field of study that reveals the ide... more
  • Life in a Jar: The Irena Sendler Project

    by Jack Mayer
    The true story of a Polish Catholic social worker, Irena Sendler, who rescued 2,500 Jewish children from the Warsaw Ghetto, but whose heroism was forgotten and whose history was repressed under communism. Sixty years later, three Kansas teenagers, each carrying her own burden, “rescue the rescuer” and elevate Irena Sendler to an international hero, championing dignity, acceptance, and respect for all people. These Kansas teens helped crack open Polish/Jewish dialogue about the Holocaust and th... more
  • The Growth and Collapse of One American Nation

    by Donald Fraser
    Our identity as one nation is fragile today, much as it was when the Civil War erupted in 1861. Lincoln, in closing his first inaugural address, warned: “We are not enemies, but friends. We must not be enemies.” But too often in our time, we view those we disagree with as enemies, as members of a different nation. \tThat was the challenge our ancestors faced too, and they allowed their differences to devolve into a civil war. Perhaps that struggle was inevitable, since the overriding moral issu... more
  • Our Honest Charlie Wood

    by Josephine Carr
    Our Honest Charlie Wood is the story of a Victorian jockey born in the slums of Hull. At the height of his powers in the 1880s, Charles Wood was Champion Jockey but his popularity and wealth threatened the dominance of the British aristocracy in a sport where they were all powerful. His story mirrors the social changes taking place in the late Victorian era. The power of aristocratic patronage was in decline as their servants became wealthy and influential and they set out to protect the... more
  • Promises of Betrayals

    by Fazle Chowdhury
    The December 2018 Literary Titan award-winning book Promises of Betrayals demonstrates the revealingly complex and profound caution in the re-examination of Iran as it has remained shrouded in a murky cloud to those responsible for directing United States policy. Fazle Chowdhury fills the crucial information gaps by exploring key Iranian history events that has directly and indirectly shaped Iran's doctrine while syndicating 500-years of trials that has permanent implications on the clerical reg... more
  • Enoch Crosby Master Spy of the American Revolution

    by Michael Boyajian
    Enoch Crosby was the greatest spy of the American Revolution so much so that at times it was hard to tell if he was working for the British or the Americans.
  • Exploring Chán: An Introduction to the Religious and Mystical Tradition of Chinese Buddhism

    by Chuan Zhi
    Chuan Zhi, an ordained monk in the Chinese Linji tradition, takes us on a fascinating journey to uncover the causes and conditions that led to Chan’s formation as a unique expression of Chinese Buddhism. Along the way, he explores some complex topics: How and why did the Chan institution invent its characteristic lineage system and what is its significance? How has state sponsorship shaped the presentation of Chan and Zen throughout the Orient? How might there be a disparity between the mystica... more
  • The Growth and Collapse of One American Nation

    by Donald Fraser
    Our identity as one nation is fragile today, much as it was when the Civil War erupted in 1861. Lincoln, in closing his first inaugural address, warned: “We are not enemies, but friends. We must not be enemies.” But too often in our time, we view those we disagree with as enemies, as members of a different nation. \tThat was the challenge our ancestors faced too, and they allowed their differences to devolve into a civil war. Perhaps that struggle was inevitable, since the overriding moral issu... more
  • Collective Amnesia: American Apartheid: African Americans' 400 Years in North America, 1619-2019

    by Eugene DeFriest Betit
    Examines all stages African Americans have experienced in American History: slavery, emancipation, Jim Crow and extreme racial prejudice. Essentially, this the part of American history that has been excised because it is embarrassing. Chapters address White supremacy and racism, slavery, US Colored Troops' role ending the Civil War, Destruction of the South, Emancipation, Reconstruction, the Freedmen's Bureau, the "Lost Cause," "Redemption," Jim Crow, blacks' participation in the two world w... more
  • Classic Candy: America's Favorite Sweets, 1950-80

    by Darlene Lacey
    From classics such as the Hershey bar and M&Ms to trend-setters like PEZ and Atomic Fireballs, candy has a special place in our hearts and memories. Lacey details the evolution of candy in America, looking at the classics from a variety of angles. With a look at everything from chocolate to fruity sweets, from simply packaging to product tie-ins, Lacey examines the classic candy of the late-twentieth century, including what it meant--and what it still means--to most of us.

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