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History & Military

  • How World War II Changed America

    by Earl Ofari Hutchinson
    Earl Ofari Hutchinson's new book, How World War II Changed America, is scheduled for release on August 6, designated Hiroshima Day globally and months before commemoration of the 80th anniversary of the December 7. Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. The attack propelled the U.S. into the war. The events continue to spark discussion, debate, and reflection on the lessons still to be learned from World War II. How World War II Changed America pays tribute to the enduring changes the war brought t... more
  • We Must All Be Ready to Sacrifice

    by Dean Ulland
    “We must all be ready to sacrifice...” -Albert Lea Women’s Auxiliary for Promoting National Defense, May 1st, 1917 Soon after the United States declared war on Germany in April 1917, it became clear that all Americans would need to be involved in the war effort. The people of Freeborn, Mower, and Steele Counties in Southern Minnesota were no exception. Young men registered for the draft and went off to war; they had no assurance of victory or of ever coming home again. Women, farmers, ... more
  • They Called Him Marvin: A History of Love, War, and Family.

    by Roger Stark

    "This novel is destined to be a best-seller and the new "American Classic Wartime" novel of our time"... 

    “They were the fathers we never knew, the uncles we never met, the friends who never returned, the heroes we can never repay. They gave us our world. And those simple sounds of freedom we hear today are their voices speaking to us across the years.” -Former President Bill Clinton 

    Such a man was 1st Lt. Dean Harold Sherman, B-29 Airpla... more

  • Joe's Alamo Unsung

    by Lewis E. Cook
    Remember the Alamo! is a slogan known worldwide for courage in battle against overwhelming odds. In that historic stand less than two hundred volunteers fought against five thousand soldiers for thirteen days. According to Joe, the only male survivor, all races and religions fought and died there.
  • MultiStories: 55 Antique Skyscrapers and the Business Tycoons Who Built Them

    by Mark Houser
    More than 100 years ago, towering marvels like New York's Flatiron Building thrilled the public and transformed cities across the country. Now take a tour of the best of these elegant landmarks still standing today in 31 U.S. and 5 international cities. Packed with colorful tales of the powerful executives and self-made millionaires who commissioned the country's first skyscrapers, MultiStories also traces the emergence of modern corporations in banking, media, transportation, insurance, manufac... more
  • The Great American Delusion: The Myths Deceiving America and Putting the West at Risk

    by Patrick Davies
    Something is going badly wrong in America. But what is really happening, why, and what does it mean? Could the US itself now be the greatest threat to the future of the West? In this fascinating account of America today, Patrick Davies, former British Deputy Ambassador to the US, sets out to understand how America, blinded by myths of its own exceptionalism, has failed to tackle serious political, social and economic problems which are exacerbating divisions in its society, poisoning its pol... more
  • The Ghosts of Belcourt Castle

    by Harle H. Tinney
    With some new stories and pictures, the third edition of THE GHOSTS OF BELCOURT CASTLE recounts stories of apparitions seen, heard, and experienced in Newport, Rhode Island’s “Gilded Age” mansion of the Belmont Family. Belcourt stood empty for fifteen years until the Tinney Family purchased it in 1956. A residence and showplace, the castle was furnished with antiques from thirty-three countries and some of them were HAUNTED.
  • WORLD WAR BRANDS: World War II and the Rise of the Modern American Brand

    by Barry Silverstein
    “Economic growth, product proliferation and television converged in the crucible of post-war America to create the fertile soil needed for modern brands to take root and bloom,” observes Barry Silverstein in this fascinating book. Exploring the interrelationship of World War II and American brands, Silverstein shows how the war itself was “branded,” how brand advertisers leveraged the war, and how the post-war economy helped birth the modern brand. Included are scores of stories about some of th... more
  • Tattoo

    by W. Patrick Lang
    Memoir of a soldier who came from a family of soldiers, fought in Vietnam, became a leading figure in US intelligence, a scholar on Middle East affairs after serving as military attache and special advisor in a number of Arab countries, and as a senior Defense Intelligence Agency officer.
  • Pages and Leaflets of North Oxfordshire

    by Angela Fortnum
    "Every family has a story. And for Angela Fortnum, her maternal family story would begin eight generations before her and reach back to the turn of the eighteenth century in England?and it is a story that she will tell and continue today. In Pages and Leaflets of North Oxfordshire, author Angela Fortnum shares a well-researched family history of her maternal grandfathers, offering a compelling window into the life and times of her ancestors. This history chronicles the Page family?s shift from... more
  • The Trial of Blood

    by Andrew Porter Brown
    In 55 years of teaching in both high school and college, I’ve always wondered why American history is presented the way it is. History texts try to cover the big picture and students never get an understanding of our wars – how they are the eyes and memory of the veterans who fought the battles in the big campaigns described by their textbook. I went to a writing seminar conducted by the celebrated Civil War historian Shelby Foote and he was gracious as Southern gentlemen are who smoke pipes and... more
  • Star-Spangled Panties

    by Carol A. Strickland

    Up the patriarchy!

    Come read about Diana, Princess and Champion of the legendary Amazons, presented in an ever-so-slightly opinionated manner that will explain everything important about the lady starring in Those Movies and comics. She’s been around since 1941, you know, and has seen a lot of changes through the years.

    If you take your aspirin when warned, you’ll even learn about her beloved younger sister, Donna Troy, who suffers from the worst continuity in comic bo... more

  • Escape from Manchuria

    by Paul Maruyama
    In the closing days of WWII, the Soviet Union attacked and occupied Japanese-controlled northern China, then called Manchuria. Immediately, misery and death from cold, hunger, disease, and brutality descended on the Japanese civilians at the hands of the Soviet Army and revenge-seeking mobs and bandits. Nearly 2,500 Japanese, mostly the elderly and children, died daily. Three courageous Japanese men embarked on a secret mission and escaped to Japan to eventually bring about an end to the Manchur... more
  • Subsurface History of Humanity: Direction of History

    by Victor Torvich

    In Subsurface History of Humanity, Victor Torvich briefly reviews the mankind's history for the last 44 thousand years. The book will help you to make sense of the history of humankind. Victor Torvich found the objective direction of the development of humanity. That direction is not related to subjective terms like purpose, destiny, meaning, happiness, higher morale, or alike. Victor Torvich specializes in the complex system of humanity. Insights from his academic papers on this topic he... more

  • The Pages of History

    by David Carney
    This volume is a collection of documents that have, in some critical way, shaped our world. Each is quite short, taking up no more than one or two pages. The contents of the documents include speeches, addresses, prefaces, proclamations, manifestos, declarations, and testaments; each appeared at a significant moment in world history. Each document is preceded by a short commentary that explains the specific circumstances in which it came to be, and also its broader historical context.
  • Nine Days Traveling

    by Lawrence Krumenaker
    In 1824, President James Monroe invited the last surviving General from the Revolutionary War, the French-born Marquis de Lafayette, to return the United States to help celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Revolution. Among the 24 states Lafayette visited in over 12 months was Alabama. He spent nine days traveling from the Chattahoochee River, through the Creek Indian Nation along the Federal Road—arguably the first Interstate highway—to Montgomery, then down the Alabama River via the new, fa... more

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